Hermopolis prayerbook

poppet-prince:

charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos

I LOVE THIS SO MUCH

Enjoying life

Yesterday I tried to resist the urge to go to Stockholm.
I failed. And so I’m going! :))

Bought a tour for two, via russian Groupon, for boat cruise from St.Petersburg to Helsinki/Stockholm/Tallinn (5 days/4 nights).
And I’m going with a friend (a girl who currently rents a room in my flat; she is cool :)

This is the museum I want to visit in Stockholm this time:
http://www.varldskulturmuseerna.se/en/medelhavsmuseet/
(Interactive tour on Egyptian exhibit - check it out!)
http://egypten.medelhavsmuseet.se/
igamuinacra , there are some cool Ptah statues too.

Every time when I thought on the ibis statues photo on the museum home page, I felt that I need to visit this city again especially for this museum (I’ve been in Stockholm two times already).

Helsinki is quite boring city (I’ve been there several times; people from St.Petersburg go there very frequently just for shopping), but I once went to Helsinki just to watch Aida opera performance.
And I haven’t been in Tallinn yet, so it would be nice to take a look!

So, 5 days/4 nights, on a boat “Princess Anastasia” that sails Baltic Sea cruises from our city.
If anyone want to look, what these Baltic Cruises are like, look at the official website - they have virtual tour there, too :)
Youtube video about the boat & cruise - look how much fun it could be

I traveled to Stockholm on boat before, but with Tallink Silja (through Helsinki or Riga).

bixiewillow:

intaier:

I wanted for so long time to make this pic. =)))* Ibis picture and story grabbed from here*I may dedicate this pic to satdeshret , lol

It’s official, I have to reblog this whenever I see it.

I need it back :))

bixiewillow:

intaier:

I wanted for so long time to make this pic. =)))

* Ibis picture and story grabbed from here

*I may dedicate this pic to satdeshret , lol

It’s official, I have to reblog this whenever I see it.

I need it back :))

I kind of want to print out pamphlets in heiroglyphics and knock on peoples doors going “Do you have a moment to talk about the word of our Egyptian Savior, Anubis?”

Probably you need to make a meme picture with cute “preaching animal” (dog or jackal). =)

thetwistedrope:

Read the full post here.

My comrade in Ukraine is currently writing really big essay about the Ogdoad. I believe it will come out being on very good level of scholarship, even if he’s not an egyptologist with degree.
Probably currently he’s already most knowledgeable person about the Ogdoad in all Ukraine :) and may be it would be true for Russia somehow too.
I can’t wait for his essay and I’m helping him to gather bits of information about Ogdoad from different sources.

Egyptian Prosperity Magic by Claudia Dillaire

trueriptide:

Do not buy this. Ugh. Not worth the ten dollars. Basically a list of recipes of various herbs/oils and a long incantation followed by it. Thing is that the majority of these incantations that I saw had the same ending portion.

Pass.

Ancient Egyptian Magic by Rosemary Clark reads heavily like one of Silver Ravenwolf’s books - filled with horoscopes and elemental charts. Also pass.

Rosemary Clark’s not just about horoscopes. Skip the zodiac parts and elemental charts, and you suddenly find a lot of advices about the logistics of running a kemetic temple. For a group of people who want regular ritual practice. And yes, many of these advices are useful.

Grave-Tending for the Akhu

satsekhem:

2. I wouldn’t leave candles and incense, especially unattended. I occasionally light a tea light, but this is on very rare occasions and I almost never bother with incense. I do leave food and water. I usually bring bread and flowers, which I leave in a general area for all of those in the cemetery to feast upon (with the woodland creatures).

It’s interesting that the people of soviet generation, here, in former Soviet Union and now Russia, almost always leave food and water on cemeteries when tending the graves.
And, there’s a whole “cult” about raising flowers.
It is not connected with russian orthodox church tradition, in fact, orthodox church does not approve when people leave food and drinks on cemetery.
But, lots of people also bring candles (usually tealights in protective tubes).

Of course all families are different, but our particular family was very much “into” proper grave-tending. My father taught me through his entire life, that it is very important to care about ancestor’ graves and about proper burials.
So, when I was still small kid, we visited the graves of ancestors regularly. All the grandparents. And I’ve been taught to bring food “for animals and birds”. It was a “folk” belief that when you leave food (usually candy or cakes) on graves and birds or squirrels come to eat in your presence, it’s a “good sign” from the dead.
Interesting that even soviet “secular atheists” used to keep this tradition.
And I enjoyed there small “offerings” for birds and squirrels (spotting a squirrel on cemetery was always considered as a very GOOD sign… interesting, eh)

diesvitae:

Commission for irishbanshee92

diesvitae:

Commission for irishbanshee92

Egyptian Prosperity Magic by Claudia Dillaire

thetwistedrope:

satsekhem:

trueriptide:

Do not buy this. Ugh. Not worth the ten dollars. Basically a list of recipes of various herbs/oils and a long incantation followed by it. Thing is that the majority of these incantations that I saw had the same ending portion.

Pass.

Ancient Egyptian Magic by Rosemary Clark reads heavily like one of Silver Ravenwolf’s books - filled with horoscopes and elemental charts. Also pass.

IIRC the Rosemary Clark book is heavily UPG.

Rosemary Clark is largely Hermetic. But yes. Pass on both authors. Both will give you a lot of stuff to unlearn.

Rosemary’s calendars are total mess. I just skip them entirely.
Also, the book is badly sourced.

*However*, her rituals are nice for non-reconstructionalist approach.
And they are good for group use.

We did one of large Clark’s rituals just recently and it went very nicely (so now I’m being asked to translate more of her things).
However again, we don’t “copy-paste” blindly, we used her ritual as a base for our own, but there were other things included.
The main invocation in the middle of ritual was the one by J.P.Feliciano (which I translated into russian several months ago and it’s really amazing). besides, it’s based on authentic sources (I may easily spot references to PGM spells and AE hymns).
So, it works together.

But, *our* group, for better definition :) is a group of hermetics who want to do “kemetic stuff”/work with Netjer. Most of people in the group work with other traditions too. Such as, we have people whose primary traditions are western esoteric/ceremonial magic, or hindu, or chinese alchemy. Hermeticism binds us all together and opens us wonderful way to explore riches of Egypt.
It’s one of the reasons why Clark’s book received warm welcome here. But of course we approach all the books with caution.

superbnature:

Splendid Fairy Wren by ianmccamley http://ift.tt/1ndVINk

superbnature:

Splendid Fairy Wren by ianmccamley http://ift.tt/1ndVINk

ancient-egypts-secrets:

( source )
dwellerinthelibrary:

A relief of Sekhmet breastfeeding the pharaoh Niuserre, from the king’s funerary temple, now at the Neues Museum in Berlin.

dwellerinthelibrary:

A relief of Sekhmet breastfeeding the pharaoh Niuserre, from the king’s funerary temple, now at the Neues Museum in Berlin.